Spinner
Recommandé il y a 9 mois
Gjnk6ygumjd8xlxbakbr
#exhibition #brasilianartists #graffitis #paintings

OSGEMEOS, Déjà Vu

  0

OSGEMEOS broke onto the art scene during the late 1980s as graffiti writers in their São Paulo neighborhood of Cambuci.

-

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce Déjà Vu, the Brazilian artist duo OSGEMEOS’ first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. Twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo together have developed an internationally recognized style born of influences across pop culture, music, folk art, and their vivid inner worlds. Déjà Vu presents new paintings and a sound installation from the highly influential artists who are sought out for numerous high profile collaborations and commissions, transforming buildings and public spaces across Europe, South America, and the United States.

March 26 – May 12, 2018

alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text alternate text

Photo: Kitmin Lee. Courtesy the artists and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.

Known internationally for a figurative style that typically features their signature yellow characters, thin dark red outlining, and intricately patterned designs, OSGEMEOS broke onto the art scene during the late 1980s as graffiti writers in their São Paulo neighborhood of Cambuci. Initially influenced by the graffiti movement coming out of New York, they were ultimately inspired by the ingenuity and resourcefulness evident in their working class neighborhood, and sought to make their art accessible to the community as a way to contribute a sense of optimism.

Déjà Vu extends OSGEMEOS’ approach to their exhibitions as an immersive, multi-sensory experience, as exemplified in their many international institutional shows. The exhibition pays tribute to music in particular with their mixed media sound installation, White Carnival (2016), where the artists have painted their characters directly onto speakers in a formation that resembles a choir. More traditional paintings from a recent series of work pays homage to the late 1970s and early 1980s, the period which represents a coming of age for the artists. This era, considered the golden age of hip-hop, is intrinsically linked to their practice with comparisons evident in the bravado, improvisational structure, and descriptions of everyday life on the streets. Additional paintings reflect upon lived and imagined experiences the artists share, including allegorical motifs such as water and the moon and stars, which have long appeared in their work, rendered vividly to conjure a lucid dream state.